Wednesday, 22 August 2007

WPQs 16 July 2007: Permanent Residency in Singapore and Singapore Citizenship

I've previously posted about being fobbed off when asking for statistics on PRs and citizens. So in July, I tried again. As is evident from the following, I was fobbed off again. It really bothered me, because I very strongly feel that the executive has to be accountable to Parliament, especially in a system like ours that is so strongly dominated by one party. I won't go into just how upset I was, suffice to say I spent a lot of time in a bit of a funk questioning why I bothered doing this. (Which is why the positive comments left in response to some posts during that period meant so much to me.)

But that passed, I got my energy back, and I'm trying again this month. And if I fail this time, that's OK. I've still got 2 years to go.

WPQ #1

PERMANENT RESIDENCY IN SINGAPORE
(Figures)

Mr Siew Kum Hong: To ask the Deputy Prime Minister and Minister for Home Affairs in 2006, how many Malaysian, Indonesian, People’s Republic of China and Indian nationals were granted permanent residency in Singapore.

Mr Wong Kan Seng: In 2006, about 57,000 persons were granted permanent residency status in Singapore. These new permanent residents (PRs) came predominantly from Asian and South-East Asian countries. We also get immigrants from diverse places such as the Americas, Oceania and Europe (please see table below).

Table: PR granted by region in 2006

NationalityGranted PR in 2006Percentage
South East Asian Countries27,54348.1%
Other Asian Countries26,12545.6%
Others3,6426.3%
Total57,310100.0%

WPQ #2

SINGAPORE CITIZENSHIP
(Figures)

Mr Siew Kum Hong: To ask the Deputy Prime Minister and Minister for Home Affairs in 2006 (a) how many of the foreign nationals who became Singapore citizens were then Malaysian, Indonesian, People’s Republic of China or Indian nationals; and (b) of these persons, how many were then Singapore permanent residents.

Mr Wong Kan Seng: In 2006, about 13,000 persons were granted Singapore Citizenship (SC). These new SCs came predominantly from Asian and South-East Asian countries (please see table below). Out of these new citizens, about 73% were PRs when they were granted citizenship. The rest of the new citizens were minors who do not need to obtain PR status first in order to be eligible for citizenship under the Constitution.

Table: SC granted by region in 2006

NationalityGranted SCPR when granted SCPercentage of new citizens who were then PRs
South East Asian Countries5,3723,81271.0%
Other Asian Countries6,6225,56784.1%
Others1,21525521.0%
Total13,2099,63472.9%

4 comments:

family man said...

as a parent with 3 sons, I thank you again for asking these tough questions - questions which my PAP MP would probably not ask.

Thank you!

Aaron said...

Dear Kum Hong,

When you try again, make sure they cannot fob you without looking really bad by rephrasing your question. I'm not sure if it makes any difference but I would suggest asking in such a way:

To ask the Deputy Prime Minister and Minister for Home Affairs in 2006

a) how many of the foreign nationals who became Singapore citizens were then Malaysian nationals

b)how many of the foreign nationals who became Singapore citizens were then Indonesian nationals

c)how many of the foreign nationals who became Singapore citizens were the People’s Republic of China nationals

d)how many of the foreign nationals who became Singapore citizens were then Indian nationals

Of the above mentioned categories A to D, how many were then Singapore permanent residents?

Siew Kum Hong said...

To family man: Thanks.

To aaron: I've filed the questions for next week's sitting already. I'll share them and the responses :).

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